Fishing

There’s a whole world to discover inbetween the banks.

Wonderful Waters

Fishing on the White River in central Indiana offers anglers a diverse and rewarding experience. With its calm waters, variety of surroundings, and accessible fishing spots, the White River offers opportunities for both experienced anglers and beginners looking to enjoy a day of fishing in the heart of Indiana.

What’s in the River?

The White River in central Indiana is home to a variety of game fish species that attract anglers. Some of the common game fish species found in the White River in central Indiana include:

Boat Launches

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Lafayette Trace Park

Popular fishing and boating access spot.

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Forest Park

Filled with attractions and activities, Forest Park is a destination for the entire family!

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Broad Ripple Park

A dog park, outdoor pool, walking trails, great playgrounds for kids, and more all along the White River.

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Riverside Park

Get active! Golf, launch a boat, enjoy the courts all within Riverside Park’s 860+ acres.


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Noblesville DNR Boat Ramp

Public access boat ramp next to Forest Park

Regulations

It’s important to check the current fishing regulations and any specific rules or restrictions that may apply to the White River or any other water body in Indiana before fishing for game fish. Size limits, catch limits, and other regulations may apply to certain species, and it’s the responsibility of anglers to comply with all applicable fishing regulations.

A license from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources is required for adults to fish, including in the White River. Children 17 and younger do not need a license. Licenses are available for a year as well as short-term periods of one day (for residents and non-residents) or one week (non-residents). 

Fishing Licenses

Licenses can be purchased online or through a network of retailers. For adults, fees (as of 2023) are $23 per year or $10 per day for residents and $60 per year or $15 per day for non-residents.

Check the calendar for free fishing days.

Catch Limits

In any stream or river in Indiana, anglers are limited to 5 of any combination of largemouth, smallmouth or spotted bass. Of these, no fish 12 to 15 inches may be kept and no more than two over 15 inches may be kept.

Boating/Paddling Guidelines

If your fishing trip involves a watercraft, be sure to follow the regulations for paddling as well.

Other Fishing Regulations

Consult the Indiana Fishing Regulations Guide for complete regulations regarding fishing in Indiana.

It’s important to note that fishing regulations can change, and it’s the responsibility of anglers to be aware of and comply with the current fishing regulations in the White River or any other water body in Indiana. Anglers can obtain the most up-to-date and specific fishing regulations from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) website, official fishing regulations publications, or by contacting the Indiana DNR directly.

Fish Consumption

Most waterways in Indiana have consumption advisories that vary based on the species of fish and who is eating them and even those that don’t fall under a general statewide guideline. According to the Indiana State Department of Health, the two contaminants that primarily drive consumption guidelines are mercury and PCBs, which are legacy industrial contaminants, as well as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a more recent “forever chemical” used in things like waterproofing and firefighting foam. While these pollutants generally exist in very low levels, they can accumulate in fish tissue, and then human tissue, over time, causing problems. Guidelines are issued to keep this accumulation to safe levels.

Always refer to the Indiana State Department of Health for the most up-to-date information regarding consumption advisories for the White River or any waterway in Indiana.

North of Stony Creek in Noblesville

  • Channel Catfish, Any Size: Do not eat
  • Common Carp, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Crappie, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass Under 16″: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass Over 16″: One meal/month
  • Smallmouth Bass, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Sunfish, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Other Species, Any Size: Refer to Statewide Guidelines

  • Channel Catfish, Any Size: Do not eat
  • Common Carp, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Crappie, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Smallmouth Bass, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Sunfish, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Other Species, Any Size: One meal/month

* Sensitive population includes females under age 50 excluding women who are no longer capable of becoming pregnant, males underage 15, and people with compromised immune systems.

Stony Creek in Noblesville to Broad Ripple Dam in Indianapolis

  • Channel Catfish Under 24″: One meal/month
  • Channel Catfish Over 24″: Six meals/year
  • Common Carp, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Crappie, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass Under 16″: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass Over 16″: One meal/month
  • Smallmouth Bass, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Sunfish, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Other Species: Refer to Statewide Guidelines

  • Channel Catfish Under 24″: One meal/month
  • Channel Catfish Over 24″: Six meals/year
  • Common Carp, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Crappie, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Sunfish, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Other Species, Any Size: One meal/month

* Sensitive population includes females under age 50 excluding women who are no longer capable of becoming pregnant, males underage 15, and people with compromised immune systems.

South of Broad Ripple Dam in Indianapolis

  • Carpsucker, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Channel Catfish, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Common Carp, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Crappie, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Flathead Catfish, Under 23″: One meal/month
  • Flathead Catfish, Over 23″: Six meals/month
  • Freshwater Drum, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass, Under 10″: Unrestricted
  • Largemouth Bass, Between 10″ and 15″: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass Over 15″: One meal/month
  • Redhorse, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Rock Bass, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Smallmouth Bass, Under 15″: One meal/week
  • Smallmouth Bass, Over 15″: One meal/month
  • Spotted Bass, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Sunfish: Unrestricted
  • Other Species: Refer to Statewide Guidelines

  • Carpsucker, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Channel Catfish, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Common Carp, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Crappie, Any Size: One meal/week
  • Flathead Catfish, Under 23″: One meal/month
  • Flathead Catfish, Over 23″: Six meals/month
  • Freshwater Drum, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Largemouth Bass, Under 15″: One meal/week
  • Largemouth Bass Over 15″: One meal/month
  • Redhorse, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Rock Bass, Under 7″: One meal/week
  • Rock Bass, Over 7″: One meal/month
  • Smallmouth Bass, Under 15″: One meal/week
  • Smallmouth Bass, Over 15″: One meal/month
  • Spotted Bass, Any Size: One meal/month
  • Sunfish: One meal/week
  • Other Species: One meal/month

* Sensitive population includes females under age 50 excluding women who are no longer capable of becoming pregnant, males underage 15, and people with compromised immune systems.

Outfitters & Rentals

Two Forks Guide Service
Two Forks Guide Service

Looking for an outstanding day on the river? Local fishing guides can help you enjoy a fully furnished, full-day experience of solitude and beauty on the river complete with insider knowledge on where the best fishing spots can be found.

Property and Trash Guidelines

Be a Good Steward

While the river and a portion of the riverbank up to an invisible line known as the ordinary high water mark is public property, always be sure to fish on public lands or with the permission of a private landowner. If you see no trespassing signs, or posts or trees painted with a purple band, do not trespass.

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